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MIDWIFERY BASICS Infant feeding 1. Anatomy and physiology


Joyce Marshall,Senior lecturer in Midwifery, University of Huddersfield

 

 (June 2016)


‘Infant feeding’ is the 12th series of ‘Midwifery basics’ targeted at practising midwives. The aim of these articles is to inform and encourage readers to seek further information through a series of activities relating to the topic. In this first article of the new series, Joyce Marshall reviews the anatomy and physiology required to underpin the information and support provided to breastfeeding women.
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MIDWIFERY BASICS INFANT FEEDING 3. Skills to support infant feeding


Joyce Marshall, Senior lecturer, Midwifery, University of Huddersfield

 

 (June 2016)


‘Infant feeding’ is the 12th series of ‘Midwifery basics’ targeted at practising midwives. The aim of these articles is to inform and encourage readers to seek further information through a series of activities relating to the topic. In this third article Joyce Marshall considers the skills needed by health professionals and others to support breastfeeding women. SCENARIO Jenny looked down at her eight day old baby David who was sleeping peacefully. ‘I must be doing something wrong’, she thought to herself, ‘otherwise why would he be feeding for such a long time and so often?’ She heard a knock at the door and went to greet Amanda the community midwife. Jenny had phoned to ask if the community midwife could visit because she was worried that breastfeeding was not going so well. She was not sore but she was now becoming concerned about how often he was feeding and she felt exhausted. As they walked back into the lounge chatting, David started to wriggle, suck on his fist and murmur. Jenny lifted him up and, holding him close, said: ‘and now he is wanting another feed’.    
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Supporting young mothers who want to breastfeed


Phoebe Pallotti

Lecturer in maternal care at University of Leeds

 (April 2016)


This article is a discussion of some of the current knowledge on how to best support young mothers who wish to breastfeed. It includes practice points taken from Phoebe's own qualitative research on young mothers and infant feeding and also a discussion of the valuable work of other midwives and researchers on the subject. We know that breastfeeding can have significant benefits for mothers and their babies; we also know that young mothers, as a group, are less likely to breastfeed than other mothers. Breastfeeding is an emotional subject: it can be empowering and satisfying, but it can also be a time of emotional strain and negative feelings of guilt and failure. This article aims to increase the understanding of what young mothers may want and need from breastfeeding support.
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